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Showing 5 articles from June 21, 2010.

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Fulton Airport to expand
WORK UNDERWAY ON MULTI-YEAR EFFORT
TO IMPROVE FULTON AIRPORT

FULTON, Ky., Construction to expand and improve the Fulton Airport and enhance economic development efforts in Fulton and Hickman counties is under way with a contract awarded for grade and drain work. The target completion date for the first phase of the overall project is this fall.
 
The $1,200,000 contract involves moving dirt and constructing drainage structures that will prepare the site for lengthening the local runway to 4,000 feet, widening it to 75 feet and making provision for a taxiway that will extend the full 4,000 feet of the runway’s length. Sierra Bravo Construction Co., of Sesser, Ill., was the successful bidder.
 
In next year’s budget cycle, the Fulton Airport Board expects funding to allow paving work for the larger runway and taxiway. Further, new lighting and instrumentation will be installed to aid airport operations in all weather conditions day and night. This includes PAPI and REILS lighting along with new runway and taxiway lighting. A new GPS approach system is also planned together with a new windsock and rotating beacon.  New hangers will be built in the future and will be located in the area adjacent to the recently constructed terminal building.
 
This airport is the only paved facility of its type in Fulton County and also serves a significant portion of Hickman County. It provides close-at-hand airport availability to parts of Obion and Weakley counties in Tennessee.
 
 
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Navy Official Discusses Climate Change Investment Strategy

Navy Official Discusses Climate Change Investment Strategy

By Bob Freeman
Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy

A number of recent strategic Defense Department documents have recognized that the changing climate may affect national security and military operations later in the century.

“One of the investments we're really going to have to think about in the next several decades is the impact of sea level rise on the Navy's infrastructure,” Titley said. “That includes our ports and piers in the continental United States, but we also need to think about bases we use in conjunction with our partners and allies overseas.”

As an example, Titley mentioned Diego Garcia, a small, low-lying island in the Indian Ocean that hosts a strategic airfield.

“The observations have shown us that through the 20th century, sea level rose by an average of two millimeters per year,” Titley said. “So that means over the course of the century, we had about 20 centimeters, or roughly eight inches, of sea level rise. The sea level rise we've seen in the first 10 years of the new century is already 50 percent greater than the average sea level rise in the 20th century.”

Titley explained that as the oceans get warmer, they expand and take up more space, causing the sea level to rise. In addition, the land-based ice that already is melting -- including mountain glaciers, the Greenland ice field, and even the western Antarctic ice sheet -- will add volume to the ocean. He acknowledged considerable uncertainty over the time line and extent of sea level rise, but he noted that leading climate scientists believe sea levels could rise as much as six feet by the end of the century.

Titley said the main goal of Task Force Climate Change is to ensure the Navy is not taken by strategic surprise, and he expressed satisfaction that climate change is being considered in strategic war games and limited objective experiments. He described these as “thinking exercises” that examine various strategic scenarios to determine how to handle them, to evaluate whether the assets are available to handle them, and to identify shortfalls.

 


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Oh. Yum. Host considering Gov. race in Ought Twelve
Oh. Yum. Host considering Gov. race in Ought Twelve
Tim Havrilek, the Underground Rooster, is reporting that Jim Host of Host Communications is "quietly" considering a run for governor. Host was the go to guy who got corporate sponsorship for the Louisville Sports Arena - now known as the KFC Yum! Center.

Host, who has run for office before, is in his early seventies. The Rooster's story drops some other GOP names that might be interested in getting in the upcoming governor's race.  
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US Navy go into more Harm's Way
The US Navy, like the US Army and National Guard are entering an age of strategic shortages, natural resources wars, and possible glimate change or man made natural disiasters. Already, the US is fighting two hot wars and strained to contain Korea, and counter the military expansion plans of an awaking China blue water navy (deep waters).

Any more strategic flash points going "HOT" could be the tipping point in ripping apart the US national budget. This story about the movement of American warships through the Suez  Canal is case in point. Conditions are becoming ripe for Amrica to be pulled into another international shooting conflict tarbaby in the Middle East.

Question: What would we do if the terroist or other forces were able to sink an American Carrier in the tight waters of the Suez Canal or Straits of Horitzs?

The American aircarft carrier is largely a strategic product and concept of Wourld War II. New threats from  21st Century sucide fast moving toropedo boatst loaded with light weight cruse missiles or dirty atomic materials could be serious threats to these large slow moving  ships in conjested waters.       
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Technology & Science

Yo. Jim Gooch! The US Navy believes in global warming.

Navy Official Discusses Climate Change Investment Strategy

A number of recent strategic Defense Department documents have recognized that the changing climate may affect national security and military operations later in the century.

“One of the investments we're really going to have to think about in the next several decades is the impact of sea level rise on the Navy's infrastructure,” Titley said. “That includes our ports and piers in the continental United States, but we also need to think about bases we use in conjunction with our partners and allies overseas.”

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