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Showing 7 articles from February 26, 2008.

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Kentucky might end nuclear plant ban
Rudy has finally introduced a bill! But who benefits from HB 542, citizens in Rudy's district or special friends in the nuclear business?
Kentucky might end nuclear plant ban
FRANKFORT, Ky. – Three state legislators are trying to overturn a nearly-quarter-century ban on nuclear power in Kentucky, as the nuclear industry vies for a comeback. Two companion bills -- one in the Senate, the other in the House -- would remove a requirement stipulating that before any nuclear plant is built, there must be a permanent disposal facility to handle its radioactive waste.
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Beginning of the End For Yucca Mountain or the Beginning of Interim Nuclear Waste Management?”
Will Rudy's Bill make West Kentucky the Next Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Site?
Beginning of the End For Yucca Mountain or the Beginning of Interim Nuclear Waste Management?”
Marshall Cohen, an official of the Nuclear Energy Institute told the Las Vegas Review Journal that the industry is looking to several communities that might welcome interim storage of its used fuel. Two or three communities, according to Cohen, are showing interest in the proposition, but he declined to name them pending further negotiations. He did say, however, that some were among the 11 sites that once volunteered to host a government run nuclear waste reprocessing site. Those states were Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, Ohio, South Carolina and Washington..
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Energy Group Urges Planning for Droughts:
Energy Group Urges Planning for Droughts:
As Atlanta and other cities in the region run low on water, the burden of having water-hogging nuclear and coal plants diverting massive amounts of water is increasingly evident. This week Alabama’s Governor Riley sent a letter to President Bush about Alabama’s opposition to the state of Georgia’s efforts to get an emergency drought response in place, citing the dire need for Alabama to get water to supply nuclear plant Farley along the Chattahoochee River. Riley’s letter stated, “At a minimum, the lack of adequate cooling water could require a shutdown of the plant, thereby putting the reliability of the electric power grid in the region at risk.”
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List of Nuclear Power Plant Disasters
The nuclear weapons complex generated waste, pollution, and contamination that pose unique problems, including unprecedented volumes of contaminated soil and water, radiological hazards from special nuclear material, and a vast number of contaminated structures. Factories, laboratories, and thousands of square miles of land were devoted to producing tens of thousands of nuclear weapons.
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Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Distaster
Three Mile Island ca. 1979
Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Distaster
The Three Mile Island accident was the most significant accident in the history of the American commercial nuclear power generating industry. It resulted in the release of a significant amount of radioactivity, an estimated maximum of 13 million curies of noble gases (480 petabecquerels), but under 20 curies (740 gigabecquerels) of the particularly hazardous iodine-131, to the environment
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Vice President Cheney 2001 Energy Plan
Big Brother talks about Big Energy
Vice President Cheney 2001 Energy Plan
Give nuclear power a fresh look Nuclear power can both solve America’s energy woes and help protect the environment, Vice President Cheney told CNN. The answers, Cheney said, lie in increasing the supply of energy sources -- a policy that would include giving nuclear power “a fresh look.” Cheney said, “It is a safe technology and doesn’t emit any carbon dioxide at all. With the gas prices rising the way they are, nuclear is looking like a good alternative.” Cheney acknowledged that the problem of nuclear waste was “a tough one” and that the US would need to establish a single location to dump the waste, a program he said has been very successful in Europe. “Right now we’ve got waste piling up at reactors all over the country,” he said. “Eventually, there ought to be a permanent repository.” Cheney foresees an additional 1,300 to 1,900 new power plants over the next 20 years to meet demand -- some of which could be nuclear plants -- along with a number of refineries to process oil. Source: Interview with CNN’s John King May 8, 2001
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Reprint article from Feb. 2008: Western Kentucky Water: Will it be for Tourism or Energy Power Plants?
Who will own the Sunset over West Kentucky waterways?
Reprint article from Feb. 2008: Western Kentucky Water: Will it be for Tourism or Energy Power Plants?
From Courier Journal Article: The existing law effectively puts a moratorium on nuclear power in Kentucky, since there is no permanent disposal facility in the United States. The federal government has been studying locating one at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for more than two decades. But the legislation by Sens. Bob Leeper, I-Paducah, and Charlie Borders, R-Russell, and Rep. Steven Rudy, R-West Paducah, would allow nuclear power plants in Kentucky as long as they have a waste-disposal plan that complies with federal law, such as securing the waste at the plants. The waste remains dangerous for thousands of years. Leeper and Borders both acknowledged that the bill could help constituents involved in the nuclear fuel industry, but they also said they are looking to help the nation and Kentucky diversify their energy supplies.
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