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What is Take Five?

Take Five

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This article is about the Dave Brubeck Quartet jazz piece. For other uses, see Take Five (disambiguation).

"Take Five"

Single   by The Dave Brubeck Quartet

from the album Time   Out

Released

1959

Format

7 in. record

Recorded

1959

Genre

Jazz

Length

5:28 (album version)
  2:55 (single edit)

Label

Columbia/Legacy

Writer(s)

Paul Desmond

Producer

Teo Macero

"Take Five" is a jazz piece written by Paul Desmond and performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet on their 1959 album Time Out. Recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studios in New York City on June 25, July 1, and August 18, 1959,[1] this piece became one of the group's best-known records. It is famous for its: distinctive, catchy saxophone melody; imaginative, jolting drum solo; and use of the unusual quintuple (5/4) time, from which its name is derived.[2] The song was first played to a live audience by The Dave Brubeck Quartet at the Village Gate nightclub inNew York City in 1959.

The inspiration for this style of music came during a US State Department sponsored tour of Eurasia and Brubeck observed in Turkey a group of street musicians performing a traditional Turkish folk song that was played in 9/8 time, a rare meter for Western music. After learning about the form from native symphony musicians, Brubeck was inspired to create an album that deviated from the usual 4/4 time of Jazz and experimented in the more exotic such styles he experienced abroad.[3]

While "Take Five" was not the first jazz composition to use this meter, it was one of the first in the United States to achieve mainstream significance, reaching #25 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #5 on Billboard's Easy Listening survey, the precursor to today's Adult Contemporary charts, in 1961, two years after its initial release.

"Take Five" was re-recorded and performed live multiple times by The Dave Brubeck Quartet throughout the group's career. In addition, there have been many covers of the piece. Some versions also feature lyrics, including a 1961 recording with lyrics written by Dave Brubeck and his wife Iola, sung by Carmen McRae. Al Jarreau performed an unusual scat version of the song inGermany in 1976.

"Take Five" has been included in countless movies and television soundtracks, and still receives significant radio play. It was for several years during the early 60s the theme music for the NBC "Today" program, the opening bars played half a dozen times and more each day.

Upon his death in 1977, Desmond left the rights to royalties for performances and compositions, including "Take Five", to the American Red Cross, which has since received combined royalties of approximately $100,000 per year.[4]


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